MOEBIUS

THE SCULPTURE RESIDENCY OF ARPA IS HOUSED IN THE HISTORIC CASA MOEBIUS IN MEXICO CITY. THE SPACE COMBINES CAST MODULAR ELEMENTS WITH EVER-CHANGING LIGHT IN A RECONCILIATION OF OPPOSITES, PROVIDING HAVEN FOR RESEARCHERS TO CONSIDER THE DIMENSIONAL VALENCES OF ALL THE SENSES.

Completed in 1978 by the modernist architect Ernesto Gomez Gallardo, who designed the main altar at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Mexico City as well as furniture for the Japanese Embassy in Mexico, the structure is a soft brutalist masterpiece open to the changing phases of the day. Against gridded ceilings and stairwells, which connect to give the building its namesake form, are unexpected onyx and glass apertures, overlooking a multi-level outdoor space for sculpture exhibition.

19°2557N 99°759W

‘HE GOES DOWN THE STEEP STAIRCASE THAT DESCENDS TO HIS STUDY EVERY MORNING IN A PATH WHERE THE FLOORS BECOME WALLS AND THESE IN TURN ARE TRANSFORMED INTO CEILINGS.'

PARIS

Researchers are invited to the Arpa sound and fragrance laboratory, to develop experimental proposals on sonic oscillations and their vibrational correspondences to other sensorial wavelengths. In the Paris space, iconic pieces of modular design such as a 1929 Western Electric 16a speaker collect moments from the birth periods of sequenced music. Reverberating these synthesized waves into the future, the space surrounds residents in an ongoing series of experimental compositions.

‘THE IDEA WHEN YOU ARE MAKING FRAGRANCE IS TO HAVE ALL THESE MODULES TO CREATE SEQUENCES. THAT WAS ALSO THE CASE WITH THE BIRTH OF SYNTHESIZERS.’

Arpa, the Institute of Synesthesia, encourages visionary expression and gathers collective experience at the edges of cognitive possibility involving sound as a new language, including chromesthesia and tactile-auditory associations. cognitive possibility involving sound as a new language, including chromesthesia and tactile-auditory associations.

48°54.01’N, 2°24.27’E

KYOTO

With its codified conduct and its synesthetic relationship to perfume, the Japanese incense ceremony of kodō materializes one of Arpa founder Barnabe Fillion’s main inspirations in perfume making. Like the kodō precept, at Arpa, you will listen to the smell. Apparition and disapparition are at the core of Arpa’s experiment. In between worlds, perfume is a passage to hidden sensory and temporal dimensions.

At its incense studio in Kyoto, Arpa welcomes seekers to partake in fragrance and incense ceremony, a ritual in which smoke and smell reveal their metaphysical and mystical dimensions.

‘THE VOID INTO WHICH FRAGRANCE DISAPPEARS, ESCAPES AND RESONATES: THIS IS FROM WHERE AND WHY I CREATE PERFUME’ BARNABE FILLION

35°041N 135°465E

19°2557N

MOEBIUS

The sculpture residency of Arpa is housed in the historic Casa Moebius in Mexico City. The space combines cast modular elements with ever-changing light in a reconciliation of opposites, providing haven for researchers to consider the dimensional valences of all the senses.

‘He goes down the steep staircase that descends to his study every morning in a path where the floors become walls and these in turn are transformed into ceilings.’

Completed in 1978 by the modernist architect Ernesto Gomez Gallardo, who designed the main altar at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Mexico City as well as furniture for the Japanese Embassy in Mexico, the structure is a soft brutalist masterpiece open to the changing phases of the day. Against gridded ceilings and stairwells, which connect to give the building its namesake form, are unexpected onyx and glass apertures, overlooking a multi-level outdoor space for sculpture exhibition.

PARIS

48°54.01’N, 2°24.27’E

Researchers are invited to the Arpa sound and fragrance laboratory, to develop experimental proposals on sonic oscillations and their vibrational correspondences to other sensorial wavelengths. In the Paris space, iconic pieces of modular design such as a 1929 Western Electric 16a speaker collect moments from the birth periods of sequenced music. Reverberating these synthesized waves into the future, the space surrounds residents in an ongoing series of experimental compositions.

‘The idea when you are making fragrance is to have all these modules to create sequences. That was also the case with the birth of synthesizers.’

Arpa, the Institute of Synesthesia, encourages visionary expression and gathers collective experience at the edges of cognitive possibility involving sound as a new language, including chromesthesia and tactile-auditory associations. cognitive possibility involving sound as a new language, including chromesthesia and tactile-auditory associations.

KYOTO

35°041N

With its codified conduct and its synesthetic relationship to perfume, the Japanese incense ceremony of kodō materializes one of Arpa founder Barnabe Fillion’s main inspirations in perfume making. Like the kodō precept, at Arpa, you will listen to the smell. Apparition and disapparition are at the core of Arpa’s experiment. In between worlds, perfume is a passage to hidden sensory and temporal dimensions. At its incense studio in Kyoto, Arpa welcomes seekers to partake in fragrance and incense ceremony, a ritual in which smoke and smell reveal their metaphysical and mystical dimensions.

‘The void into which fragrance disappears, escapes and resonates: This is from where and why I create perfume’ Barnabe FIllion